How Might I … (part 2)

The only way to try something new, to innovate your practice, is to ask questions about your practice. 

A previous colleague of mine put forth the above statement at a staff meeting last year and it has really stuck with me.  As I mentioned in a previous post, this colleague also added that these questions about practice should not arise from a place of crisis or specific problem-solving (of course, there is a time for asking those questions) but rather a desire to reach a goal and grow in practice and craft.  I have since incorporated taking the time to stop, reflect, and ask the “How Might I…” questions about my own practice.  I try to make the time to share my questions here.

As I have also mentioned on this blog, I am in the midst of a family “gap year”.  I am in a time of healthy and exciting transition, reflection and reading.  I am enjoying seeing the nature of my questions regarding my practice during this time out of the classroom. They are definitely quite broad!

Again, in the spirit of innovation and personal growth, here are the questions I am asking right now:

How Might I …

… keep my practice process-driven and help students to see the benefits of, and develop skills, to make quality products?

… further help students to be able to generalize the meaningfulness of their learning experiences, beyond the obvious, to other parts of the world, themselves and their actions?

… plan for content and curriculum that focuses outward from the subject matter (towards the greater world) as much as it looks inward at the specifics?

I am thinking a lot about, and I think the above questions are all connected to, “stickability”.  I am thinking about what I do as a teacher to be sure knowledge is moving into my students’ long-term memories, where it sticks.  Also, what are the best ways to be sure the content students are learning is likely to continue to come up in meaningful and recognizable ways?

As always, thanks for reading.  What big questions are you asking right now?  I’d love to hear.

 

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s